Fellows

overview
Professor David Marsh

Contact

Address: Building 23 Level B, University of Canberra Phone: + 61 (0) 2 6201 5526

Centre

Centre for Change Governance

Organisation

Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis at the University of Canberra

Research Interests

Political sociology, power, political participation, critical policy studies, policy transfer, critical realism

 

 

JournalMcCaffrie, B., & Marsh, D. , (2013), Beyond Mainstream Approaches to Political Participation: A Response to Aaron Martin, Australian Journal of Political Science, 48, 1, pp. 112-117
JournalPlumb, A. and Marsh, D. , (2013), Beyond Party Discipline: UK Parliamentary Voting on Foxhunting, British Politics, (UK Palgrave Macmillan), 8, pp. 313-332
JournalEvans, M., Stoker, G and Marsh, D. , (2013), Localism in the present and the future, in Evans, M., Marsh, D., and Stoker, G.(eds.), Policy Studies, Double Special Issue, 34, 5-6, pp. 612-617
JournalEvans, M., Marsh, D., and Stoker, G. , (2013), Understanding Localism, Policy Studies , 34, 4, pp. 401-407
JournalFawcett, P. & Marsh, D., (2012), Policy Transfer and Policy Success: The Case of the Gateway Review Process (2001-2010), (Government and Opposition), 47, 2, pp. 162-185
bio/cv

David Marsh is a British political scientist. He was previously Director of the Research School of Social Sciences at ANU. Prior to this he was Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Birmingham, and also worked at the University of Strathclyde and the University of Essex.

Marsh's publications include Theory and Methods in Political Science (co-edited with Gerry Stoker, Palgrave Macmillan, 1995/2002/2010), Demystifying Globalization (co-edited with Colin Hay, Macmillan/St Martin's Press, 2000) and The New Politics of British Trade Unionism: Union Power and the Thatcher Legacy (Macmillan, 1992). He has published over 90 articles and book chapters during his career.

publications

Selected Publications:

  • Marsh, D., Vines, E. and Halupka, M. (Forthcoming), "Two Cheers for Richards and Smith: Beyond Anti-politics?", The Political Quarterly

  • Ercan, S. A. and Marsh, D. (2016), ‘Qualitative methods in Political Science’. In Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Political Science, Edgar Elgar Publishing.

  • Marsh, D. & Hall, M. (2016), “The British Political Tradition and the Material-Ideational Debate”, The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 18, 1, pp. 125-142

  • Zhang, Y. and Marsh, D. (2016), “Learning by Doing: the case of administrative policy transfer in China”, Policy Studies, 37, 2, pp. 35-52

  • Akram, S., Emerson, G. and Marsh, D. (2015), “(Re)conceptualising the third face of power: insights from Bourdieu and Foucault”, Journal of Political Power, 8, 3, pp. 345-362
  • Marsh, D and Akram, S. (2015), “The Thatcher Legacy in Perspective”, British Politics, 10, pp. 52-63
  • Marsh, D. (2015), “Two Cheers for Boswell and Corbett”, Critical Policy Studies, 9, 2, pp. 230-233
  • Marsh, D. and McCaffrie, B. (2015), “One Cheer for Jordan and Cairney: Taking the Governance Literature Seriously”, British Politics, 10, 4, pp.475-485.
  • Marsh, D., Akram, S. and Birkett, H. (2015), “The Structural Power of Business: Taking Structure, Agency and Ideas Seriously”, Business and Politics, 17, 3, pp. 577-601
  • Marsh, D and Akram, S. (2015), “Political Participation and Citizen Engagement: Beyond the Mainstream”, Policy Studies, 36, 6, pp. 523-531
  • Marsh, D and Akram, S. (2015), “In Conclusion”, Policy Studies, 36, 6, pp. 640-643.
  • Fawcett, P. and Marsh, D. (2015), “Depoliticisation, governance and political participation”. In Flinders, M. and Wood, M., eds, Tracing the Political: Depoliticisation: Governance and the State, Bristol, Policy Press, pp. 47-70
  • Fawcett, P. and Marsh, D. (2014), “Depoliticisation, Governance and Political Participation”, Policy and Politics, 42, 2, pp. 171-188
  • Marsh, D. (2014), “What is the Nature of the Crisis of Democracy and What can we do about it?”, Democratic Theory, 1, 2, pp. 37-46
  • Marsh, D. and Birkett, H. (2014), “What is to be Done? A Broad Church and the Impact of Political Science Research: A Response to Matthew Wood”, Politics, 34, 3, pp. 301-305
  • Marsh, D., Hall, M. and Fawcett, P. (2014), “Two Cheers for Interpretivism: Deconstructing the British Political Tradition”, Australian Journal of Public Administration, 73, 3, pp. 240-348
  • Marsh, D. and Lewis, C. (2014), “The Political Power of Big Business: A Response to Bell and Hindmoor”, New Political Economy, 19, 4, pp. 628-633
  • Marsh, D., Lewis, C. and Chesters, J. (2014), “The Australian mining tax and the political power of business”, Australian Journal of Political Science, 49, 4, pp. 711-725
  • Marsh, D., Akram, S. and McCaffrie, B. (2014), “A Crisis of Participation”. In Richards, D., ed., Institutional Crisis in Twentieth Century Britain, Basingstoke, Palgrave, pp. 39-59
  • McCaffrie, B., & Marsh, D. (2013), “Beyond Mainstream Approaches to Political Participation: A Response to Aaron Martin”, Australian Journal of Political Science, 48, 1, pp. 112-117
  • Plumb, A. and Marsh, D. (2013), “Beyond Party Discipline: UK Parliamentary Voting on Foxhunting”, British Politics, UK Palgrave Macmillan, 8, pp. 313-332
  • Evans, M., Stoker, G and Marsh, D. (2013), “Localism in the present and the future”. In Evans, M., Marsh, D., and Stoker, G.(eds.), Policy Studies, Double Special Issue, 34, 5-6, pp. 612-617
  • Evans, M., Marsh, D., and Stoker, G. (2013), “Understanding Localism”, Policy Studies , 34, 4, pp. 401-407
  • Fawcett, P. & Marsh, D. (2012), “Policy Transfer and Policy Success: The Case of the Gateway Review Process (2001-2010)”, Government and Opposition, 47, 2, pp. 162-185
  • Fawcett, P. and Marsh, D. (2011), “Branding and Franchising a Public Policy: The Case of the Gateway Review Process 2001-2010”, The Australian Journal of Public Administration, 70, 3, pp. 246-258
  • Fawcett, P. Manwaring, R. & Marsh, D. (2011), “Network Governance and the 2020 Summit”, The Australian Journal of Political Science, 46, 4, pp. 651-67
Research Projects & Grants
PhD Supervision

Area of Supervision:

  • Political sociology
  • Power
  • Political participation
  • Critical policy studies
  • Policy transfer
  • Critical realism

Involvement in PhD Supervisory Panels:

  • Hamish Sinclair, "What is the future of strategic planning for the national capital?" (Advisor)
  • Melanie Glavimans, "Fortune-telling and Psychic Healing in our everyday lives: A phenomenological exploration of psychics and individuals consulting them in Australia" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Pia Rowe, "New Forms of Political Participation: Women's Participation in a Feminist Social Movement, MamaBake" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Richard Reid, "De-mystifying institutional change: The House of Lords in Transition" (Secondary Supervisor)
  • Katie Singleton, "Money Matters: Measuring the Effectiveness of Pluralism- A Case Study of Power in the Huner Valley Region" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Lucas Carmody, "Global Talent and the Global City" (Secondary Supervisor)
  •  Max Halupka, "Contemporary Political Participation: Exploring the Relationship between Technology and Politics in Late-Modernity" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Mick Chisnall, "Collaboration and Contestation - ICTs and Government Hierarchy" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Natalie Boal, "Religion in Australia - Understanding the complex relationship between comprehensive doctrines and policy and politics" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Scott Bridges, "Al Jazeera's growing footprint: Ho is Al Jazeera building legitimacy and affecting journalism across the non-Arabic-speaking world?" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Sajeda Tuli, "Migration and the Knowledge City: A Case Study of Global Melbourne" (Advisor)
  • Emma Vines, "Does Government Know Best?: The Challenge of European Integration and the Marginalisation of `the People' in the British Political System" (Primary Supervisor)
  • Flavia Hanlen, "Institutional change and the role of the state in capitalist systems" (Secondary Supervisor)

 

 

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