National Security Hub

National security concerns today are emerging in contexts a variety of new and unexepected contexts. Espionage practices are making greater use of unconventional forms of collection. These include persons relying on their authentic identities using the ubiquitous nature of encrypted communications to hide their connections to hostile intelligence services while working for companies, completing research projects at universities, or using their positions to develop access to politically influential persons. Covert political interference can be conducted from the safety of an aggressor country and distributed online reaching sizeable audiences never conceivable in a pre-digital era when documents had to be forged and distributed through front organisations and face-to-face networks of persons. Cyber attacks threaten to commandeer our computers and phones. And global environmental change has led to far reaching consequences in terms of food security, refugee flows, competition over water resources, weather events, and pandemics.

Changes in the the security environment have created a new landscape that no one today is able to escape from. Countries have sometimes found comfort in being surrounded by allies or vast oceans to protect their borders and the security of their citizens. In an era of global networks; global flows of persons, goods, and services; and global environmental change, the ‘friends and fish’ approach to national security is no longer adequate. The front lines of the new national security threats are all around us and permeate core governance questions.

Professor Sascha Dov Bachmann Prof. Co-convener - National Security HubView Profile
Associate Professor Michael JensenCo-convener - National Security HubView Profile
Professor Peter Leahy ACDirector - National Security InstituteView Profile
Professor Darren SinclairDirector of the Center for Change Governance View Profile